Wednesday, 08 Oct, 2008 Environment
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Parrot Trade under Ban in Mexico

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Conservationists beat the alarm. They demand that illegal parrot trade in Mexico should be banned. There are 22 parrot species in Mexico, haft of which is in danger and almost all of them are under federal protection. However, every year almost 78,000 parrots are entrapped illegally. The worst thing is that these birds die before being delivered to their owners.

Environmentalists consider that the government fails to take all due measures against illegal trade and fowling of exotic birds. It’s absolutely necessary to amend Mexico’s wildlife law which will help to put an end to clandestine business. The new bill will come into force when it is promulgated in the official congressional diary which should happen by the end of October.

The defenders of exotic birds consider U.S. to be the major factor stimulating illegal sale of rare species such as the yellow-naped parrot, which inhabits just the Mexican state of Chiapas.

In general these birds are delivered to Tijuana and Ciudad Juarez situated on the border with U.S.. Yet the greatest number of parrots remain in Mexico. They are distributed among numerous markets all over the country.

The parrot trade in Mexico can be performed only within the legal term, i.e. through a federally established conservation area. According to government resolution it is allowed to capture between 3,000 and 4,000 parrots every year. Unfortunately, there is no effective mechanism that would identify legally and illegally entrapped birds. It’s especially difficult at informal markets where the only marker of a legally captured parrot is a band around its leg. Government officials manage to expropriate only 2 percent of illegally transported parrots.

Alongside this professional bird trappers also defend their rights. Many of them capture exotic birds legally in order to make their living. They think that legal bird trade should be permitted as people are glad to have an exotic bird at home.

Source: National Geographic
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Posted by sharaeff

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